Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress–All Questions

Go to: Contact Information || About the Smarter Balanced Online Summative Assessments || Test Dates || Test Time and Scheduling || Technology || Training and Information || Test Administration || Performance Tasks || Universal Tools, Designated Supports, and Accommodations || Assigning Accessibility Resources || User Management || Making Enrollment Changes || English Learners || California Alternate Assessments (CAAs) for ELA/Mathematics/Science || California Spanish Assessment (CSA)

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Contact Information

Who do I contact if I have general questions about the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP), specific questions related to uploading students and navigating the online delivery system, or questions about my school’s participation in the CAASPP assessments?

Test administrators and test examiners should contact their CAASPP test site coordinator; CAASPP test site coordinators should contact their local educational agency (LEA) CAASPP coordinator; LEA CAASPP coordinators should please contact the California Technical Assistance Center (CalTAC) either by using the Chat box in the right margin of all caaspp.org pages or by telephone or Email:

Phone: 800-955-2954
E-mail: caltac@ets.org

About the Smarter Balanced Online Summative Assessments

Which grade levels participate in the Smarter Balanced assessments?
Students in grades three through eight and grade eleven participate in the Smarter Balanced assessments for English language arts/literacy and mathematics.
What are the components of the Smarter Balanced assessments?
The Smarter Balanced assessments comprise two components: the computer adaptive test and the performance tasks.
What is the difference between a test segment and a test session?
A test segment is an allocated preset group of items. A test session is a unit of time scheduled for a group of students to be in a room for testing. One test Session ID corresponds to each test session.
What are performance tasks (PTs)?
The Smarter Balanced assessments comprise two components: a performance task (PT) and computer adaptive testing items. A PT is a portion of the Smarter Balanced assessment that requires students to answer a set of questions that are centered on a common theme or problem.
Can a private school purchase the Smarter Balanced Summative Assessments?
No. California has paid for membership in the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, so public schools can access all Smarter Balanced assessments.
How many questions are in each segment of an online assessment?
The number of test questions within a segment varies by content area, grade, and test type (computer adaptive test or performance task). For interim assessments, an online guide external icon is available that details the number of questions in each content area and grade.

Test Dates

When will my local educational agency (LEA) need to complete administration of the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) assessments?
Pursuant to the California Code of Regulations, Title 5 (5 CCR), sections 855 (a) (1), 855 (a) (2), 855 (a) (3), 855 (b), and 855 (c), the rules for the establishment of the testing windows for CAASPP testing are as follows:

  • Grades Three through Eight and Grade Eleven English Language Arts/Literacy and Mathematics
    • The available testing window shall begin on the day in which 66 percent of a school’s or track’s annual instructional days have been completed, but no earlier than the second Tuesday in January of each year;
    • Testing may continue up to and including the last day of instruction for the regular school’s or track’s annual calendar, but no later than July 15 or the next weekday following the 15th;
    • A local educational agency (LEA) may establish a selected testing window of no less than 25 days within their available testing window (taking into account that the CAAs will not be available until March 20, 2017); and
    • An LEA may extend a selected testing period up to an additional 10 consecutive instructional days if still within the available testing window.
  • Science in Required Grades Five, Eight, and Twelve; Optional Ten and Eleven
    • The selected testing window also must provide 25 instructional days for administering the California Science Test (CAST) and California Alternate Assessment (CAA) for Science, which will be available on April 2, 2018.
    If a local educational agency’s (LEA’s) 25-day testing window goes to the last day of instruction, does the LEA have to test students who enroll the last week of school (or even the week before the last week of school)?
    Yes. If a student did not complete one or more of the content-area assessments at his or her previous school, he or she must take the tests for which he or she is eligible at the new school as long as the selected testing window is still open in the new LEA. For example, a student who completes an ELA test at a school and then transfers to a school in an LEA where the testing window is still open must take the mathematics test at the new school before the testing window closes for the new LEA.
    Is the 25-day test window optional or required?
    The 25-day test window is required.
    When will my testing window be available this year?

    The testing window is established by the LEA CAASPP coordinator according to the California Code of Regulations. You will need to check with your LEA CAASPP coordinator for the exact dates of your testing window.

    California Code of Regulations, Title 5, Sections 855(b)(1), 855(b)(2), and 855(c), the rules for the establishment of the testing windows for the Smarter Balanced assessments, the CAAs, and the California Science Test (CAST) are as follows:

    • Testing shall not begin until the day of completion of 66 percent of a school’s annual instructional days, and
    • Testing may continue up to and including the last day of school.

    Test Time and Scheduling

    Are there time limits for the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) assessments?
    No; all CAASPP assessments are untimed.
    How long will the Smarter Balanced assessments take?

    The estimated amount of time individual students need will depend on the grade, content area, and type of items.

    Content Area Grade(s) Computer Adaptive Test items
    hrs:mins
    Performance Task (PT)
    hrs:mins
    Total
    hrs:mins

    English Language Arts/Literacy

    3–5 1:30 2:00 3:30
    6–8 1:30 2:00 3:30
    11 2:00 2:00 4:00

    Mathematics

    3–5 1:30 1:00 2:30
    6–8 2:00 1:00 3:00
    11 2:00 1:30 3:30

    Both

    3–5 3:00 3:00 6:00
    6–8 3:30 3:00 6:30
    11 4:00 3:30 7:30
    How long will the online California Science Test (CAST) take?
    Administration of the CAST field test is estimated to take approximately two hours. Note that the CAST is an untimed test, but almost all students should complete it within one to four hours.
    Do time estimates refer to the total computer lab time, or does that time need to be multiplied by the number of classrooms?
    The time estimates do not reflect total computer lab time (including time needed to start computers, log students on, etc.); they are only an estimate of the time students will spend testing for each content area. The total test time will need to be adjusted to include those additional activities. To determine the number of students who may test simultaneously and, therefore, the total time that labs may be occupied, school personnel can use the bandwidth checker external icon.
    How should schools sequence and schedule the components of the Smarter Balanced assessments?
    For the Smarter Balanced Summative Assessments, Smarter Balanced recommends that students take the performance task (PT) and the computer adaptive testing (CAT) portions on separate days. Smarter Balanced also recommends that students begin with the CAT portion and then the PT. Local educational agencies/Schools may opt to administer the assessments in a different order if needed.
    What advice can be provided for testing students in nonpublic, nonsectarian schools (NPSs)?
    Test administrators and test examiners at NPS schools should reach out to the LEA CAASPP coordinators who is responsible for placing the student at the NPS for information about testing windows and with their questions about CAASPP testing.
    When will the test results be populated in the California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CALPADS)?
    Test results are populated in the Online Reporting System and final results are provided to local educational agencies (LEAs) and schools via printed Student Score Reports (SSRs). SSRs are also available for download on the Test Operations Management System (TOMS). Student assessment results are not available in CALPADS. LEAs and schools should monitor communication from the California Technical Assistance Center and/or the California Department of Education for information regarding the length of time test processing—from scoring submitted tests to the calculation of results—is expected to take.
    What is the online test settings deadline for the Test Operations Management System?
    The online test settings deadline can vary by test administration. For the current administration’s deadline, see the LEA CAASPP Coordinator Checklist, which is available separately and also as part of the Online Test Administration Manual. Both are available on the Manuals and Instructions Web page on the CAASPP Portal. Please also monitor communication from the California Technical Assistance Center and/or the California Department of Education for information regarding upcoming deadlines.
    Will the scores for the online Smarter Balanced Summative Assessments available within three weeks of completion include student performance on the performance task (PT)?
    The Smarter Balanced Summative Assessments for English language arts/literacy and mathematics include both computer-scored components (scored immediately) and hand-scored components. Individual student performance data will be displayed in the Online Reporting System only after students have completed the computer-scored components and the hand-scoring portion of their results have been processed. Local educational agencies and schools should monitor communication from the California Technical Assistance Center and/or the California Department of Education for information regarding the length of time test processing—from scoring submitted tests to the calculation of results—is expected to take.
    When does the 20-day clock start for sending Student Score Reports to parents/guardians?
    Pursuant to California Code of Regulations, Title 5, Section 863 (a) and (b), Student Score Reports must be made available to each student’s parent or guardian within 20 days of receipt of the report at the local educational agency (LEA). However, if the reports are received after the last day of the instructional year, the report must be made available within 20 working days of the next school year.
    What is the effect of the science tests on testing windows?
    [This item is reviewed in the Test Dates FAQ.]

    Technology

    What are the technology requirements?
    Please refer to the Smarter Balanced Technology Strategy Framework and System Requirements specifications posted on the Smarter Balanced Technology Web page for information about supported technology and technology requirements.
    Can students use their mobile devices to complete the assessments?

    Yes, students may test on any tablets that meet Smarter Balanced technology requirements. Please refer to the Smarter Balanced Technology Strategy Framework and System Requirements specifications located on the Smarter Balanced Technology Web page. See also the Technical Specifications Manual for Online Testing Web document. The following table lists currently supported tablets, operating systems, and browsers, but Speech-to-Text cannot be used with mobile devices including tablets and Chromebooks.

    Operating System Supported Tablets Browsers for
    TA Sites
    Android 4.04 – 4.2 Google Nexus 10
    Motorola Xoom
    Samsung Galaxy Note (10.1)
    Samsung Galaxy Tab 2 (10.1)
    Google Chrome
    Chrome OS 31 – 35 Chromebooks Google Chrome
    iOS 6.0 – 7.1 iPad 2, 3
    4th generation (Retina Display)
    iPad Air
    Safari
    How do I access the secure browser for the online Smarter Balanced assessments?
    Instructions for downloading the secure browser can be found in the Secure Browser Installation Manual. Secure browsers can be downloaded directly from the Secure Browsers Web page (which is also linked on the CAASPP Portal).
    My school has already downloaded a secure browser for statewide testing. Do we need to download another secure browser?
    Yes, school personnel must annually download the secure browser for online testing.
    Are there special directions/requirements for the secure browser on Chromebooks, Android tablets, or iPads?
    Refer to the Secure Browser Installation Manual for information on downloading and using the secure browser on Chromebooks, Android tablets, and iPads.

    Training and Information

    What training resources are available?

    There are a variety of resources are available to help LEAs, schools, and students prepare for the 2014–15 CAASPP assessments:

    Online Training Modules:

    Online training modules are available at CAASPP Training Videos.

    The Training Test and Practice Tests:

    It is highly recommended that all students access the Practice Tests and/or the Training Tests. Each resource offers students a unique opportunity to experience items similar to what they will see on the operational Smarter Balanced assessments.

    Manuals and User Guides:

    There are a number of manuals and user guides posted on the Instructions and Manuals Web page that include topics such as Smarter Balanced policies, procedures for administering the CAASPP assessments, and step-by-step instructions on how to use the Test Operations Management System (TOMS), the Test Administrator Interface, and other features of the test delivery system.

    Are there tools available for Test Administrators (TAs) to practice monitoring student testing?
    The Test Administrator Practice and Training Site can be accessed through the CAASPP Portal. Through this Web site, TAs can practice administering Practice and Training Tests to students.
    What is the difference between Training Tests and Practice Tests?
    Training Tests are shorter, arranged by grade band, and include new item types (e.g., hot text and matching). Students are able to access and practice using all of the test tools, supports, and accommodations, which are not currently available on the Practice Tests. Training Tests do not include performance tasks (PTs). Practice Tests are longer and arranged by grade level. Practice Tests also includes PTs.
    Are rubrics available for the Practice Test?
    Yes; rubrics are available on the Practice and Training Tests Web page.
    Are there resources for parents/guardians? If so, are these resources translated into any additional languages?
    Yes; please refer to the California Department of Education (CDE) California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) System Web page.

    Test Administration

    Where can I find ELA, Math, and CAST Blueprints and what do they contain?

    Math and ELA Blueprints contain the number of items, score points, and depth of knowledge for items associated with each assessment target.

    The CAST Blueprint contains CAST claims, test segment contribution information for individual and group scores, and details of Performance Expectations (PE) Distribution.

    Can students skip questions or segments in CAT or PT?

    No, items must be answered before moving on to the next question. Students may flag questions for review then return to them within the same segment, and according to pause rules.

    Online TAM:
    CAT Pause Rule Alert: If a student has paused a test within a segment and returns to the test after the 20-minute pause limit has expired, he or she will not be able to review or change previously answered items.
    Note for CAT and PT: once a student has completed a segment and moves on, he or she cannot return to the previous segment. For this reason, students taking a CAT should review their responses before continuing to the next segment.

    More detailed information may be found on the Online TAM page 192.

    Can test administrators and examiners review test questions while students are completing the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) assessments?

    For test administrators, the answer is no; only students should be viewing the test items. Staff who would like to become familiar with the types of items to be administered may review the Online Practice and Training Tests Site.

    For test examiners, the answer is yes; because the California Alternate Assessments are administered one on one, the test examiner will see the test questions.

    Note that items on the CAASPP assessments are secure test materials.

    A student begins testing in local educational agency (LEA)/School A and then moves to LEA/School B before completing the test. Can the test be moved to LEA/School B for the student to complete?

    Yes; if a student starts a test event in one LEA/school and then moves to a different LEA/school, the test delivery system will retain that test for that student.

    For example, if the student starts the computer adaptive testing section of the test, answers some questions, and then moves to a different LEA/school in the state, the student can begin, at the new school, where he or she left off on that section. The same situation applies for the performance task (PT)—once the student logs in and starts the test, the student can finish the test at the new LEA/school taking the same PT that was started.

    Note, however, that updates to the student’s information in the California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CALPADS) may take between 24 and 48 business hours to process in the Test Operations Management System (TOMS), and another 24 business hours to process between TOMS and the test delivery system.

    Can more than one grade level test in the same room?
    While it is recommended that students be tested with their grade-level cohorts, students in different grade levels can test in the same room in a single test session. The test administrator must remember to select each grade and test within the Test Administrator Interface that he or she intends to administer during that session.
    What are the recommendations to distribute logon information to students? Can proctors log on to the test delivery system on students’ behalf?
    Test administrators may distribute slips of paper containing a student’s Statewide Student Identifier and first and last names for logon purposes. Any such materials must be kept secure at all times. Proctors may assist students with the logon process but should not log on to the test delivery system on behalf of students.
    Can test administrators help students use the test tools during testing?
    No; the directions for administration in the Directions for Administration for the Smarter Balanced Online Summative Assessments (PDF), available on the Instructions and Manuals Web page, specify the guidance test administrators can and cannot provide to students during testing. However, students do have the ability to view tutorials that are embedded in the test delivery system at any time during testing.
    Can students return to items that were flagged for review even after the segment is complete?
    No; once a student completes a test segment, he or she cannot return to the items within that segment.
    What data in the California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CALPADS) are necessary for students to test?

    The minimum data that need to be correct in CALPADS for a student to start testing are as follows:

    • Name
    • Grade
    • School and LEA information
    • CALPADS enrollment status of 10 or 30
    • U.S. school entry data (if the student is an English learner)
    • Parent/Guardian address (if the LEA wants the address printed on the Student Score Reports)
    • Fields 3.13 (education program) and 3.21 (primary disability) (if the student is to take the California Alternate Assessments or receive designated supports, accommodations, and/or unlisted resources)
    • All other demographic fields (if the LEA wants to view these fields in the final student data file that is downloadable from the Test Operations Management System [TOMS])

    CALPADS documentation, including field names and field codes, and information about CALPADS support are available on the California Department of Education California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CALPADS) Web page.

    Given that the mathematics components of the Smarter Balanced Summative Assessment for Mathematics seem to involve quite a bit of language, can English learners (ELs) also be exempt from taking mathematics?
    All students must take the mathematics assessments. However, stacked translations in Spanish are available as an embedded designated support.
    Can exempt ELs take the Smarter Balanced Summative Assessments for English Language Arts/Literacy (ELA) components if they wish to?
    Yes, an exempt EL may take the ELA assessment upon request by the student’s parent/guardian.
    Do LEAs have to upload student information to receive Pre-ID labels for paper-pencil tests or will the information be taken from CALPADS?

    CALPADS is the authoritative source for student enrollment, demographic, and program information for the student test assignment system known as TOMS. The student-level data from CALPADS will be used for the Smarter Balanced assessments (summative and interim), California Alternate Assessments, California Science Tests, and the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) paper-pencil assessments. The use of CALPADS data for these assessments underscores the importance of keeping CALPADS up to date and accurate.

    CALPADS documentation, including field names and field codes, and information about CALPADS support are available on the California Department of Education California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CALPADS) Web page.

    Can the Pre-ID information be printed directly on the answer documents and answer booklets rather than on labels?
    No; Pre-ID labels are used to allow LEAs the maximum amount of time to enter and update student information in CALPADS.
    Are there translated test directions for the Smarter Balanced ELA assessment?
    Yes. Translated test directions will be provided as PDFs by Smarter Balanced for both ELA and mathematics in the following languages: Spanish, Vietnamese, Arabic, Tagalog, Ilokano, Cantonese, Mandarin, Korean, Punjabi, Ukrainian, Russian, Dakota, French, Haitian-Creole, Hmong, Lakota, Japanese, Somali, and Yup’ik. These can be requested by an LEA CAASPP coordinator who contacts the California Technical Assistance Center.
    How long does the test administrator have between approving the students to test and having the students start the actual test?
    As a security measure, test administrators are automatically logged off of the Test Administrator Interface after 30 minutes of test administrator user inactivity and student inactivity in the test session, which will result in closing the test session. If this occurs, the test administrator will have to create a new session and the students will have to log on to the new session to resume testing. When starting a new session, the test administrators should give the students the new Session ID so they can log on and resume testing.
    What if a student’s enrolled grade is incorrect in the test delivery system?
    Any incorrect student information in the displayed demographic fields must be updated in the California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CALPADS) by an authorized user. The student should not be approved for testing until his or her grade appears correctly in the test delivery system. Please work with your CALPADS coordinator to ensure that CALPADS data are corrected.
    What if a student was tested using an incorrect Statewide Student Identifier (SSID)?

    If a student is taking a test associated with a different student’s SSID, submit the CAASPP Security and Test Administration Incident Report (STAIRS) form and then, when you have received a STAIRS case number, submit an appeal to reset a test.

    If two students are taking tests associated with each other’s SSIDs as a result of an accidental switch, submit a CAASPP STAIRS form. The LEA CAASPP coordinator also should contact CalTAC to report this.

    If two students are taking tests associated with each other’s SSIDs as a result of an intentional switch, submit the CAASPP STAIRS form and then, when you have received a STAIRS case number, submit an appeal to invalidate the tests. In this case, students should stop testing; their answered questions will be scored.

    Performance Tasks

    What are performance tasks (PTs)?

    The Smarter Balanced assessments comprise two components: a performance task (PT), which is comprised of an individually administered, computer-generated performance task; and computer adaptive testing (CAT) items. A PT is a portion of the Smarter Balanced assessment that requires students to answer a set of questions that are centered on a common theme or problem.

    Universal Tools, Designated Supports, and Accommodations

    Can I use web browsers outside of the secure browser, or their extensions, for Speech-to-Text?

    No, browser-based software/extension cannot be used for Speech-to-Text, or any permissive mode setting.

    Permissive mode is meant to allow approved applications to run outside of the secure browser for speech to text use. You cannot use other web browsers, even with permissive mode, since that would create a security risk.

    This includes, but is not limited to, Google Chrome.

    Also note that Speech-to-Text is only usable on systems that do not require a kiosk or single-app mode for testing; Windows and Mac desktop and laptop systems are allowed while Chromebooks, iPads, and Android tablets are not supported for STT.

    Where can I find guidelines related to Accessibility and Accommodations?

    Smarter Balanced has developed a set of Usability, Accessibility and Accommodations Guidelines, which applies to all students. The Guidelines provide information for classroom teachers, English development educators, special education teachers, and related services personnel to use in selecting and administering universal tools, designated supports, and accommodations for those students who need them. The guidelines are also intended for assessment staff and administrators who oversee the decisions that are made in instruction and assessment.

    In addition, there is a Usability, Accessibility, and Accommodations Guidelines Frequently Asked Questions Web document. These frequently asked questions address common inquiries from schools and districts about the delivery of universal tools, designated supports, and accommodations. This document supports the Consortium's Usability, Accessibility, and Accommodations Guidelines.

    Where text-to-speech is not available, can the Test Administrator (TA) read the assessment aloud?
    Read-aloud is only permitted in the following limited circumstances: as a non-embedded designated support for mathematics items and English language arts/literacy (ELA) items, as a non-embedded accommodation for ELA passages in grades 6–8 and 11, and for students with visual impairments in grades 3–8 and 11 who do not yet have adequate braille skills. For more information see the Usability, Accessibility and Accommodations Guidelines.
    Are headphones needed for this assessment?
    Yes; headphones are required for all ELA listening items and performance tasks, and for all students who require text-to-speech. Schools are responsible for ensuring that all students have headphones.
    Can the “Keyboard Commands for Students” be printed for students to use?
    Yes; the Keyboard Commands for Students Web document provides keyboard commands that students can use to navigate between test elements, features, and tools. Test Administrators (TAs) can print this document out for students to use as a tool during testing.
    May scratch paper or graph paper be retained between sessions?

    Printed test items/stimuli, including embossed braille printouts, scratch paper, and graph paper must be collected and inventoried at the end of each test session and then immediately shredded. DO NOT keep printed test items/stimuli or scratch paper for future test sessions.

    The only exception to this rule is when notes are used during the ELA and mathematics performance tasks. During the ELA PT, the notes on the embedded notepad (“Global Notes”) are retained from Part 1 to Part 2 so the student may go back to the notes even though the student is not able to go back to specific items in Part 1. While the embedded notepad is the preferred mode for note taking, students may use scratch paper to make notes. To ensure that students using scratch paper for notes have the same allowance as students using the online notes, TAs should ensure that students write their names (or some other personal identifier) on the scratch paper, collect students’ notes at the completion of Part 1 of the ELA PT, and then securely store the scratch paper. The scratch paper should be redistributed for students’ use during Part 2 of the ELA PT.

    Similarly, the mathematics PT may extend beyond one testing session. In this situation, TAs should ensure that students have written their names (or some other personal identifier) on the scratch paper or graph paper, collect them at the end of the first session, and securely store them for students’ use in the subsequent testing session. The retention of scratch paper is only allowed for the PTs. Following the conclusion of the PT, all scratch paper and/or graph paper must be collected and securely destroyed to maintain test security.

    Why will local educational agencies (LEAs) need printers and how can LEAs determine whether that is an accommodation their students will need?
    LEAs may need printers for the students who have Print on Demand as an accommodation. This accommodation allows for paper copies of either passages/stimuli and/or items to be printed for students. Refer to the Usability, Accessibility and Accommodations Guidelines external icon for direction on when this accommodation may be appropriate for a student.
    How soon can an LEA start uploading the accommodations and designated supports for students in the Test Operations Management System (TOMS)?
    LEAs can start uploading as soon as the students appear in TOMS. Designated supports and accommodations must be set by the responsible LEA in which the student is enrolled before the student begins testing.
    Will an LEA have to set designated supports and accommodations for late-enrolling students in TOMS?
    No; if a student’s test settings have been properly set in TOMS, they will move with the student to whichever LEA he or she is next enrolled.
    What are accessibility supports?
    Accessibility supports are not universal tools, designated supports, or accommodations. Accessibility supports shall be available if specified in the eligible pupil’s individualized education program (IEP) or Section 504 plan. Accessibility supports may or may not have been previously identified. An LEA shall submit a request to the CDE prior to the use of any accessibility support(s). For more information, please refer to the CDE Matrix One external icon Web page. LEA CAASPP Coordinators may request an accessibility support from the CDE by using the downloadable Accessibility Support Request Form.
    Will an ELA test still be generated for English learners (ELs) identified in TOMS?
    More information is forthcoming.
    Who is able to set designated supports and accommodations for students in TOMS?
    The LEA CAASPP Coordinator and/or test site coordinator have the ability to designate supports and accommodations for students in TOMS. Test site coordinators can only set designated supports and accommodations for students within their test site.

    Assigning Accessibility Resources

    How can my student use Speech-to-Text on their assigned assessment?
    • 3rd party speech recognition software. We cannot recommend 3rd party software but your device should come with a free version. Use what the student is familiar with.
    • Set accommodation to Permissive Mode
    • Supply student with headset/mic
    • Launch speech recognition software, then open secure browser
    • Cannot be used with a mobile device incl Chomebook and iPad
    Have students’ settings from the previous test administration been preserved? Will schools be updating these or starting from scratch?
    Student settings do not carry over from year to year in the Test Operations Management System (TOMS). Designated supports and accommodations must be reassigned for the current test administration.
    Once schools assign test settings for students in the Test Administrator Interface, will these apply for both interim and summative assessments?
    Test settings in the Test Administrator Interface for the interim assessments are for that test session only and are not assigned in TOMS for the student’s use in the summative assessments. The only way to assign test settings for the summative assessments is for the LEA California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) coordinator or CAASPP test site coordinator to make the assignments in TOMS.
    How are accessibility supports for the interim assessments set?

    The support settings for the interim assessments can be set in the following two ways:

    1. One by one in TOMS; these settings will persist in the summative assessments as well.
      • This is made more convenient with the use of the Individual Student Assessment Accessibility Profile Tool;
    2. The Test Administrator Interface which only persists for that test session

    Important: The supports set in the Test Administrator Interface for the interim assessments are for that test session only. If you would like to retain the settings for the summative assessments, you must change them in TOMS.

    For more information, refer to the "Student Test Settings" chapter of the TOMS Pre-Administration Guide for California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) Testing.

    If a test administrator adds a designated support in the Test Administrator Interface for an interim assessment, does doing so adjust the designated supports already in TOMS as entered by the LEA CAASPP coordinator or CAASPP test site coordinator?
    No; designated supports and accommodations entered by the test administrator in the Test Administrator Interface for a student prior to approval of an interim assessment are for that test session only.
    Must CAASPP test site coordinators or LEA CAASPP coordinators set up accessibility resources for the interim as well as the summative assessments?

    If the CAASPP test site or LEA CAASPP coordinator initially sets up student designated supports and accommodations in TOMS, they will apply to both the interim and summative assessments.

    Please note that designated supports and accommodations requested in the Test Administrator Interface for interim assessments are for that test session only and are not assigned in TOMS for the students’ use in the summative assessments. The only way to assign these settings for the summative assessments is for the LEA CAASPP coordinator or CAASPP test site coordinator to make the assignments in TOMS.

    Is there a manual that defines the test settings, to guide those who make decisions about what supports to assign students with individualized education programs?
    Yes. The Matrix One: Universal Tools, Designated Supports, and Accommodations for the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress for 2017–18 external icon Web page and the Smarter Balanced Usability, Accessibility and Accommodations Guidelines external icon Web document should be used to make selections of appropriate supports. Additional information about accessibility supports also can be found in the Accessibility Guide for CAASPP Online Testing.
    Do California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System flags for individualized education program designations need to be activated in order to select accommodations and/or designated supports for the interim assessments?
    No. The test administrator can select any accommodation in the Test Administrator Interface for a student’s interim assessment. However, if the same accommodation or designated support is required for one or more summative assessment, it must be set in TOMS by the LEA CAASPP coordinator or CAASPP test site coordinator.
    When specified accommodations and designated supports are entered into TOMS, how soon do they become available for students? Is it the same for interim and summative assessments?
    Enrollment data in TOMS, including specified accommodations and designated supports for interim and summative assessments, are updated in a background process that happens every few hours. Educational Testing Service recommends updating accommodations and designated supports at least 24 hours prior to the scheduled testing time to avoid testing irregularities due to delays in updating caused by large file sizes or the number of files in the queue.
    Why are a student’s test directions in Spanish?
    A student's onscreen test directions for a mathematics or science assessment are in Spanish because the student was assigned the Stacked Translations and Translated Test Directions (Spanish) test setting in TOMS.

    User Management

    Why are my users not able to view their Interim Assessment results within the IARS?
    • Check ART roles. Must have PII or PII_Groups
      • If PII_Groups, group must be set up in IARS
    • Have both parts of ICA been completed by student?
    • Have tests been scored, incl both parts of ICA. Note: some IAB require scoring
      • See chart for which tests require ICA scoring
      • See chart for which tests require IAB scoring
    How many secondary coordinators can one local educational agency (LEA) have?
    The LEA superintendent may name up to three secondary LEA CAASPP coordinators. Secondary LEA CAASPP coordinators are given the same user role as LEA CAASPP coordinator in electronic systems, such as the Test Operations Management System (TOMS), but will not be the primary point of contact for the LEA.
    How do I gain access to the Test Operations Management System (TOMS) and other California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) systems?
    For LEA CAASPP coordinators, access to TOMS and other CAASPP systems is granted once the LEA superintendent has submitted the Superintendent Designation Form on behalf of the coordinator. Coordinator also has to submit a Security Agreement. Primary Coordinators will need to contact CalTAC to grant us permission to add secondary coordinators. Access for all other LEA staff is granted by the LEA CAASPP coordinator either individually or via batch file upload in TOMS.
    How can additional members within our LEA obtain the LEA CAASPP Coordinator role within the CAASPP TOMS?
    1. Add to Superintendent Designation Form
    2. Submit Security Agreement
    3. Call CalTAC (800-955-2954) to add to TOMS (need primary permission to add secondaries)

    Making Enrollment Changes

    If a student leaves one local educational agency (LEA) before the academic year ends and enrolls in another LEA, what happens to his or her scores from the LEA where he or she was tested?
    If a student completes testing in all content areas at one LEA and then transfers to and enrolls at a new LEA, the student will not be tested at the new LEA, but the student’s score report will be provided to the new LEA.
    How long will student data continue to show in the Test Operations Management System (TOMS) after students are exited from the school in the California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CALPADS) for the end-of-year reporting?
    The data in CALPADS and TOMS are updated nightly, with the following approximate turnaround times for CALPADS changes to be reflected in TOMS:
    Turnaround times for CALPADS changes to be reflected in TOMS
    Local educational agency uploads new enrollments or changes in CALPADS on: Enrollments/changes show up in TOMS on the morning of:
    Monday Wednesday
    Tuesday Thursday
    Wednesday Friday
    Thursday Monday
    Friday Tuesday
    If necessary, will the California Technical Assistance Center (CalTAC) be able to correct students’ grade-level information for new students during the testing window?
    This applies only to summative assessments: If a student has not completed testing and a change to the assessed grade is requested, the LEA will need to submit a Security and Test Administration Incident Report (STAIRS) form. Once the STAIRS form has been processed and a case number has been assigned, an appeal to reset the test(s) the student has already taken can be submitted so that the student can retake the test(s). For additional information, see the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress STAIRS Process for Summative Assessments Web page.
    If a student moves to a new LEA, what action should the LEA take if data for that student continue to appear in TOMS?
    Please consult with the CALPADS coordinator to determine if the student has been updated in CALPADS. If the student has been updated in CALPADS and continues to appear in TOMS, the LEA CAASPP coordinator should contact CalTAC.
    If a student changes schools during testing and the performance task for the new school is different, which performance task does the student complete?
    Once started, a student’s performance task will follow him or her between schools and LEAs.

    English Learners

    Will an English language arts/literacy (ELA) test still be generated for English learners (ELs) identified in the Test Operations Management System (TOMS)?
    Yes; students identified as ELs in TOMS will still be assigned the ELA test unless the local educational agency (LEA) California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) coordinator or the CAASPP test site coordinator has indicated the student is eligible for (1) a one-time exemption because he or she has been enrolled in a U.S. school for fewer than 12 months as determined on or after April 15 of the previous school year, or (2) the alternate assessment as specified in the student’s individualized education program (IEP). For more information, see the “Student Test Settings” chapter of the Test Operations Management System (TOMS) Pre-Administration Guide for CAASPP Testing.
    Can exempt ELs take ELA components?
    Yes; ELs who are technically exempt can still take the ELA assessment upon request by the student’s parent/guardian. The LEA CAASPP coordinator or the CAASPP test site coordinator must ensure that the student is registered for the assessment in TOMS, if necessary (in the case of the California Alternate Assessment for ELA), and that the student’s demographic data in the California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System are configured appropriately.
    Which entry date into the U.S. school system determines if an EL needs to take the ELA test?
    Pursuant to California Code of Regulations, Title 5, Education, Section 850(v), a recently arrived English learner is one who is in his or her first 12 months of attending school in the U.S. as determined on or after April 15 of the previous school year.
    Do all ELs have access to the designated supports (e.g., text-to-speech)?

    The language access needs of ELs are addressed through the provision of numerous universal tools and designated supports. These include English dictionaries for full writes, English glossaries, and translated test directions and glossaries.

    Text-to-speech is available as a designated support to all students (including ELs) for whom an adult or team has indicated it is needed for mathematics and ELA items (but not ELA reading passages). Text-to-speech for ELA reading passages is available for an EL in all grades only if the student has an IEP or Section 504 plan because it is an accommodation. For text-to-speech to be available to an EL, it must be entered into TOMS.

    Will schools be able to select a Spanish version of the Student Score Report for all their students at once?
    Spanish-language Student Score Reports can be requested via batch upload in TOMS. See the "File Uploads" chapter in the TOMS Pre-Administration Guide for CAASPP Testing for instructions.
    If the Spanish report is selected, will the students receive it in both English and Spanish?

    Educational Testing Service will provide printed versions of both the English and Spanish Student Score Reports when an LEA requests the Spanish-language Student Score Report. Both versions will be provided in the reports shipment to the LEA CAASPP coordinator; the Spanish version should be distributed to parents/guardians and the English version should be distributed to the school.

    The Spanish version will be collated with the English version and will be placed immediately after the student’s English-language Student Score Report.

    A PDF file containing the English versions of Student Score Reports and one containing the Spanish versions will be available for download in TOMS.

    Is there an additional charge for the Student Score Report in Spanish?
    There is no additional charge for the Spanish-language Student Score Report.
    What are the testing requirements for ELs cumulatively enrolled for less than 12 months (e.g., the student disenrolled from and then re-enrolled in a U.S. school)?

    All students in grades three through eight and grade eleven must participate in the Smarter Balanced assessment in mathematics. Participation in the California Science Test field test is required for all students in grades five, eight, and twelve as well as the identified students in grades ten and eleven, with the exception of eligible students who will take the California Alternate Assessment for Science Pilot 2.

    Students are exempt from taking Smarter Balanced assessments in ELA in their first year enrolled, defined as having enrolled after April 15 of the prior year. LEAs can administer the Smarter Balanced assessment in ELA to EL students enrolled less than 12 months, but it will not be counted for accountability. The California Spanish Test, given in grades three through high school, is an optional Spanish language arts test available for students who want a measure their Spanish reading, writing mechanics, and listening skills.

    California Alternate Assessments (CAAs) for ELA/Mathematics/Science

    How do I determine the CAA Version Assignment for my school site and where can I find the resources?
    CAASPP CAA for ELA and Mathematics Version Assignments Web page is available for resources.
    Do Practice and Training Tests produce results?

    No; The practice tests provide a preview of the item types included in the Smarter Balanced assessments. (pg 24 TAM)

    Training tests are for test administrators, test examiners, and students to become familiar with the format and functionality of the online test. (pg 24 TAM)

    Do I have to make any indication within the CAASPP TOMS if my EL student needs to be exempted from the ELA assessment?
    No, the system will use the date of enrollment and update when testing window closes.
    What is the information required in order to complete a purchase order and how do we submit the information?
    When receiving purchase order forms be sure to check for:
    • LEA Name
    Is there going to be another California Alternate Assessment (CAA) for Science pilot this year?
    Yes. The CAA for Science Pilot 2 can be administered between November 2017 and the end of the local educational agency’s (LEA’s) selected testing window.
    How do I calculate if my LEA exceeds the 1 percent of students for the CAA?

    Access the TOMS Student Test Assignment Report at the LEA level to view how test assignments break down between the general assessment and alternate assessment; using this report at the test-site level will not calculate this information. You should not use the Online Reporting System to calculate this information.

    Note, however, that there are no repercussions to LEAs for exceeding this threshold.

    What are the eligibility requirements for the California Alternate Assessments (CAAs)?
    Please refer to the California Department of Education California Alternate Assessments Web page external icon for the definition of “eligible students” as it applies to students who take the CAAs. To be able to assign a student in the Test Operations Management System (TOMS) to take the CAAs, the California Longitudinal Pupil Achievement Data System (CALPADS) education program code (field 3.13) must be set to “special education” (value 144) and the primary disability category (field 3.21) must not be blank.
    Which grade levels participate in the CAAs?
    Eligible students in grades three through eight and grade eleven participate in the CAAs for English language arts/literacy (ELA) and mathematics. All students in grades five, eight and high school who are eligible to take the CAAs for ELA and mathematics also will take the second year of pilot for CAA for Science. Students in grades ten and eleven may also be assigned, if they are enrolled in their last high school science course.
    In online training this year, will CAA test examiners be required to pass quizzes with a certain percentage and/or print a certificate of completion?
    Test examiners are required to view the test administration tutorial and/or attend a locally provided training. Upon completion of the tutorial or locally provided training, text examiners must present their resulting completion certificate to their California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) test site coordinator or local educational agency CAASPP coordinator.
    Can students take the CAA in mathematics only or ELA only, or must they take the CAAs in both subjects?
    If a student is eligible for the CAAs, he or she must take both the ELA and mathematics portions. Additionally, if a student takes the CAA for ELA and mathematics in grade five or eight, then he or she must also take the CAA for Science. If a student takes the CAAs for ELA and mathematics in grade eleven, and he or she is enrolled at a high school that has been assigned to take the CAA for Science in grade eleven, then he or she must take CAA for Science. However, if eligible students in grade ten or twelve at his or her high school are assigned to take the CAA for Science, then he or she will not need to take CAA for Science.
    Does a test examiner or the computer read the CAA for ELA and mathematics questions to the student, or must the student read the questions?
    The test examiner reads the CAA for ELA and mathematics questions to the student. The script contains the exact wording that must be read aloud to the student, except when general adaptations are given. Pictures or other visual material within the test may be described as needed for students with visual impairments using the alternative text provided in the Directions for Administration (DFA) for the California Alternate Assessments, available in TOMS (for operational DFAs) or on the CAA Web page on the CAASPP Portal (for practice and training test DFAs). Students should be encouraged to answer all questions in each content area test.
    What happens if a student is logged off after 30 minutes of inactivity while taking the CAAs for ELA and/or mathematics? Will the student be able to continue the test where he or she left off or change answers?
    The CAAs for ELA and mathematics are untimed and can be administered over as many sessions and days as needed. You may pause and resume the test as many times as necessary to elicit the student’s best performance. The pause-and-resume feature can be used throughout the day, over several days, and at any time during the test administration window. Students will automatically be logged off the system after 30 minutes of inactivity. Logging back on to the test will return the student to the last unanswered question. The student will be able to return to previous questions in the stage of the test where the student last left off to change answers.
    Does a test examiner administer the CAA for Science online?
    The CAA for Science is an embedded performance task that will be available to test examiners in PDF form. The test examiner reads embedded performance tasks to students, uses a rubric to determine the student’s score for that task, and then enters a score online. While the student survey will be administered through the test delivery system, the test itself is available to the test examiner via PDF.
    When can the CAA for Science embedded Performance Tasks (PTs) be administered?
    The 2017–18 CAA for Science pilot test consists of three embedded PTs each in grades five, eight, and high school that can be administered to a student in any sequence and at any time during the 2017–18 instructional year.

    This year, test examiners must enter student testing results into the Data Entry Interface (DEI). The DEI will be available beginning January 9, 2018. Results may be entered at any time after an embedded PT has been administered to a student, but before the end of the instructional calendar for the school.

    California Spanish Assessment (CSA)

    General

    Which grade levels participate in CSA?
    • Students in grades three through eight and high school participate in the CSA.
    • There will be a grade level test in each grade for grades three through eight and one test for high school students (grades nine through twelve).
    Who can/should take the CSA?
    • Students receiving instruction in Spanish in California can/should take the CSA.
    • Students who have received instruction in Spanish can/should take the CSA.
    • Students seeking a measure that recognizes their Spanish-specific reading, writing mechanics, and listening skills can/should take the CSA.
    To which standards are the CSA aligned?
    The CSA is aligned with the California Common Core State Standards en Español external icon, which are a translation of the California Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts with linguistic augmentations specific to the Spanish language.
    Is the CSA a computer adaptive test?
    No; the CSA is a computer-based, nonadaptive, linear assessment.
    Will there be a paper-pencil version of the CSA?
    No; the CSA is administered entirely online.
    How will the CSA be delivered?
    The CSA will be delivered through the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress (CAASPP) test delivery system online. There is no paper-pencil version of the CSA.
    What language will the CSA be delivered in?
    The CSA will be delivered completely in Spanish.
    What are the domains assessed in the CSA?
    Reading, Writing mechanics, and Listening are the three domains assessed on the CSA.
    Is the CSA mandatory?
    No; the CSA is an optional test.
    Why should I administer the CSA?
    The CSA should be administered
    • if a student is seeking a measure that recognizes his or her Spanish-specific reading, writing, and listening skills;
    • to serve, in part, as an optional measure for high school students to obtain the State Seal of Biliteracy;
    • as a measure for local educational agencies (LEAs) to evaluate their Spanish language programs.
    Will the CSA be accessible to all students?
    Yes; the CSA is being developed so that it is accessible to all students. Most of the accessibility supports that students receive on the Smarter Balanced English language arts/literacy test will be available for students on the CSA.
    How does the CSA compare to the Standards-based Tests in Spanish (STS)?
    • Like the STS, the CSA is a Spanish reading/language arts assessment.
    • The CSA is being developed as a computer-based test.
    • Unlike the STS, the CSA is composed of multiple item types; the STS includes multiple-choice questions only.
    • The CSA has a broader test-taking population.
    • The CSA is an optional assessment, similar to what the STS has been for the past two years.
    • The CSA has accessibility resources that were not available on the STS.
    • The CSA will replace the STS once it is operational.
    When will the first operational administration of the CSA take place?
    The first operational administration of the CSA will take place in spring 2019.

    CSA Field Test

    When is the CSA field test?
    The CSA field test will have a fixed testing window from September 17 through October 12, 2018.
    What are the purposes of the field test?
    The purposes of the field test are to evaluate the CSA reading, writing mechanics, and listening items and create a pool of high-quality, statistically viable items to be used for the operational administration. Feedback from the field test will also be used to update and inform item writing guidelines and future item development.
    How can my LEA participate in the CSA field test?
    If your LEA would like to participate in the CSA field test, please fill out the Test Participation Survey. If you have any questions, contact CSA program administrator, Marques Barron, at mbarron@ets.org. All LEAs are invited and encouraged to participate in the CSA field test.
    If my LEA chooses to participate in the field test, will every school have to participate?
    No; any subset of schools within an LEA or students within a school can participate in the CSA field test. The field test is completely voluntary.
    Will scores be reported on the CSA field test?
    No; the CSA field test will not produce scores or reports for LEAs to view.
    How will the data from the field test be used?
    Field-test data will be used to inform the development of the operational assessment.
    When will training materials be available for the CSA field test?
    • Training tests (at the following grade bands: grades three through five, grades six through eight, and high school) will be available on the CSA Web page as early as spring 2018.
    • Training videos and manuals will be available August of 2018.
    How will the CSA field test be administered?
    LEAs will administer the CSA field test through the CAASPP test delivery system online and students will take the test on testing devices through the CAASPP secure browser.
    Why is the CSA field test assessed off-grade? What is off-grade testing?

    The CSA is a summative assessment. Because the CSA field test will be administered in the fall of 2018, students will be assessed based on the knowledge they gained during the prior school year (i.e., 2017–18).

    Off-grade testing, as it pertains to the CSA field test, is the administration of a grade-level test to a student based on the grade the student was in the previous school year.

    Do I need the secure browser for the CSA field test?
    Yes; the same secure browser used for the CAASPP online assessments is required for the CSA. Instructions for downloading the secure browser can be found in the Technical Specifications and Configuration Guide for CAASPP Online Testing. Secure browsers can be downloaded directly from the Secure Browsers external icon Web page.
    How long will it take to administer the CSA field test?
    The administration of the CSA field test is estimated to take approximately three to four hours. Note that the CSA is an untimed test, but almost all students should complete it within three to four hours.
    Should the field test be completed in one session?
    No; LEAs may administer the field test over multiple test sessions within the fixed testing window.
    What are the technology requirements for the CSA?
    The technology requirements for the CSA are aligned to the requirements necessary for all CAASPP assessments, which can be found in the Technical Specifications and Configuration Guide for CAASPP Online Testing.
    Where can I get more information about the CSA?
    For more information about the CSA please visit the CSA Web page.